AMP 2012 Annual Meeting
October 25 - 27, 2012
Long Beach Convention & Entertainment Center
Long Beach, CA

Long Beach, CA

DEADLINES

Advance Registration - September 24
Hotel Reservations - September 28

EXHIBITOR DEADLINES

Opportunities to exhibit, advertise, and host a corporate workshop still exist.
Contact Catherine Davidge by email at cdavidge@amp.org for more information.

AMP welcomes members of the press to attend the AMP 2012 Annual Meeting. Refer to the formal invitation to the media for more information.
To register as a member of the press, please use the online registration form: http://bit.ly/O5O3WR.


 

Special Features

AMP International
AMP Test Directory
Awards, Grants & Honors
Career Development
Membership Information
Online Member Directory
The Journal of Molecular Diagnostics
Trainee Programs
Web Library

How to Help

Corporate Support Opportunities
Donate to AMP

Volunteer

Corporate Partners
Diamond Partners
Abbott Molecular
Roche
Platinum Partners
Hologic
Luminex
Gold Partners

Agilent
BioFire

Silver Partners

Asuragen
Illumina
Life Technologies
Nanosphere
Nanostring

Qiagen

AMP 2012 Annual meeting

Speaker Bios

 

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

 

 

A
Amos-Wilson PhD FACMGJean Amos-Wilson, PhD, FACMG, is an American Board of Medical Genetics (ABMG)-certified Clinical Molecular Geneticist (1993), holds NYSDOH Certificates of Qualification in Genetic Testing (1991), Cellular Tumor Markers (2000) and Histocompatibility (2004) and is licensed by the State of California as a Clinical Genetic Molecular Biologist and Clinical Consultant (2002-present). Dr. Amos Wilson is currently VP, Operations for Berkeley HeartLab, Inc in Alameda, CA. She is President-Elect of the California Clinical Laboratory Association and is active in both the Association for Molecular Pathology and the American Clinical Laboratory Association. She is a Reviewer for the CLSI Molecular Methods Area Committee and was Co-Chair of two CLSI documents: MM:17A, Validation and Verification of Multiplex Nucleic Acid Assays and MM19A, Establishing Molecular Testing in Clinical Environments. Dr. Amos Wilson has been active in molecular diagnostics since the mid 1980s and is the author of over 80 peer-reviewed scientific publications.
B
Bale PhDSherri J. Bale, PhD, received her BA in Biology from Clark University, her M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from the University of Pittsburgh, and her post-doctoral training in medical genetics at the National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD. She is an ABMG Board-Certified Ph.D. - Medical Geneticist and Founding Member of the American College of Medical Genetics, served on the ACMG Professional Practice and Guidelines Committee, the ACMG Foundation Committee, the Corporate Responsibility Task Force, and works with the Laboratory Practice Committee. She is a consultant to various academic, federal, and private organizations regarding clinical, technical, and regulatory issues in genetics and genetic testing. She started GeneDx in 2000 (with Dr. John Compton) after 16 years at the National Institutes of Health. She served first as President and Clinical Director, and since 2011 as Managing Director of GeneDx. The company specializes in developing and providing molecular diagnostic tests for hereditary genetic disease in-utero, in children, and in adults using innovative methods. GeneDx was acquired by BioReference Laboratories, Inc. in 2006. Dr. Bale has authored over 130 peer-reviewed papers, book chapters, and books in the field of genetics. She serves as President of the Board of Directors of an international adoption agency that specializes in placing older and special needs children.
BartonDavid E. Barton, PhD, is Chief Scientist (Director) of the Molecular Genetics Laboratory at the National Centre for Medical Genetics in Dublin, Ireland, and Adjunct Associate Professor at University College Dublin. Having trained at Trinity College Dublin, he carried out medical genetics research at Yale University and Cambridge University before setting up the NHS molecular genetics diagnostic laboratory in Cambridge. He returned to Dublin to set up his current laboratory at the National Centre for Medical Genetics in 1995. Professor Barton has been involved in work to monitor and improve the quality of genetic testing for many years, working with UK NEQAS, the European Molecular Genetics Quality Network, the OECD and EuroGentest. He co-ordinated the EU CRMGEN project, developing certified reference materials for genetic testing. In EuroGentest he continues to work on reference materials development and also has responsibility for examining the role and impact of IVD regulation in genetic testing.
David Bick received his medical degree from George Washington University School of Medicine in Washington, D.C. , in 1981. He completed a residency in pediatrics at Yale New Haven Hospital in New Haven, Conn. , and did a fellowship in Human Genetics and Pediatrics at the Yale University School of Medicine from 1984-1986. He then completed a research fellowship in Human Genetics at the Yale University School of Medicine in 1987. Dr. Bick is board-certified in Pediatrics, Clinical Genetics, and Clinical Molecular Genetics. Dr. Bick joined the Medical College of Wisconsin (MCW) faculty in 2002. He is the director of the Advanced Genomics Laboratory (AGEN) at MCW, and the medical director of the genetics clinic at Children's Hospital of Wisconsin. He is a leader in the field of genomic medicine and has published numerous peer-reviewed articles, chapters, and reviews. Two years ago, the AGEN laboratory became the first laboratory to provide whole genome sequencing for clinical purposes.
Dr. Bick in conjunction with Dr. David Dimmock and Regan Veith, MS, CGC recently started a genomic medicine clinic at Children's Hospital of Wisconsin, an MCW-affiliated hospital. The clinic utilizes genomic sequencing to diagnose and alter medical management for patients with complex health problems that are thought to have a genetic basis.
BosslerAaron D. Bossler, MD, PhD is Associate Professor of Pathology at the University of Iowa College of Medicine where he also serves as the Director of the Molecular Pathology Laboratory and Molecular Genetic Pathology Fellowship Program. He is a member of the Editorial Board of The Journal of Molecular Diagnostics, a member and interim co-chair of AMP's Economic Affairs Committee and a member of the AMA CPT Pathology Coding Caucus (representing AMP).
Rita M. Braziel, M.D. , is currently a full professor in the Department of Pathology, Oregon Health & Sciences University, as well as Director of Hematopathology at OHSU. She was a founding member of AMP and has been active in the Hematopathology Section since its inception. She has twice served as Program Chair for the AMP annual meeting and has participated in many other AMP activities. She served as Associate Editor for Hematopathology for JMD for the first 7 years of the journal, and has more than 115 publications in the field of hematopathology. Other educational and research roles in hematopathology over the past 15 years include her service as Vice-Chair of the SWOG Lymphoma Pathology/Biology Committee, membership in the CAP Molecular Pathology Committee with an emphasis on proficiency testing in hematopathology, chairing an ASH Educational Session on molecular diagnostics, and her position as a funded member/OHSU PI for the Lymphoma/Leukemia Molecular Profiling Project (LLMPP) for the past 10 years. Her primary research interests are in neoplastic hematopathology.
C
Carpten PhDJohn Carpten, PhD, earned his Ph.D. in Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology at the Ohio State University in 1994 with a focus on human genome physical mapping and positional candidate cloning. He then went on to complete a postdoctoral fellowship at the National Human Genome Research Institute, NIH, Bethesda, in Cancer Genetics, where he was later promoted to the tenure track in 2000. Dr. Carpten then accepted a position to become Division Director at the Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen), Phoenix, AZ, in 2003 where he currently directs the Division of Integrated Cancer Genomics. In 2012 he was promoted to the position of Deputy Director of Basic Research for TGen. Dr. Carpten's research program centers around the development and application of cutting edge genomic technologies and bioinformatics analysis in search of germ-line and somatic alterations that are associated with risk and tumor characteristics, respectively. He has led and co-authored a series articles describing the roles of both low and high penetrant genetic variants in cancer risk in Science, Nature, Nature Genetics, Genome Research, and New England Journal of Medicine. To improve the discovery of important alterations associated with cancer, Dr. Carpten is co-leading the implementation, development, and application of Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) technologies at TGen. These technologies offer the opportunity to comprehensively interrogate cancer genomes to uncover the lexicon of somatic events within a tumor. Currently, the largest efforts of the Carpten laboratory are in applying NGS for Genomics Enabled Medicine, where cancer genomes and transcriptomes are sequenced and used to identify targetable events for select therapeutics. Furthermore, he is helping to drive efforts to build CLIA capabilities within TGen to support these efforts. It is his hope that this work will one day lead to improvements in knowledge based therapeutics toward improvements in outcomes for cancer patients.
ChiarleRoberto Chiarle, MD received an MD degree from the University of Turin, Italy. He also earned a Board in Surgical Pathology from the University of Torino. He did his postdoc research training with Giorgio Inghirami and Michele Pagano at the New York University, where he worked on the molecular pathogenesis of B and T cell lymphomas. He was appointed as Assistant Professor in Pathology and as Attending Physician in Pathology in the University of Turin, Italy in 1999, then promoted to Associate Professor in 2006. In Italy, he started his own lab and worked on the ALK oncogene in human lymphoma, to discover new molecular mechanisms of ALK mediated cell transformation and new ALK specific therapies. From 2008 to 2010, he was Visiting Professor in Pathology in Fred W. Alt lab at the Immune Disease Institute/Children's Hospital, Boston, where he worked on chromosomal translocations and contributed to develop a new high-throughput method to clone translocations genome-wide from primary B cells. In 2012, he was appointed as Associate Professor of Pathology at Harvard Medical School and started his own lab at the Children's Hospital Boston.
Colaiano JDJoseph M. Colaiano, JD, has been a lawyer with the Mayo Clinic Legal Department since July 2004, where he is responsible for management of all business litigation activities. Joe received his J.D. from the University of Nebraska School of Law in May 1997, and his B.A. in Communications from the University of Washington in June 1994.
D
DoganAhmet Dogan, MD, PhD, is a graduate of Hacettepe University Faculty of Medicine in Ankara, Turkey. He has a PhD in Immunology from University of London, UK, and completed his residency and hematopathology fellowship training at the University College London Hospitals, UK. Currently he is a Consultant and Professor of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology in Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN. Dr. Dogan has extensively published on the pathology of lymphoid neoplasms and amyloidosis, and clinical applications of mass spectrometry-based proteomics.
Downing MDJames R. Downing, MD, received a BS in Biochemistry in 1977 and an MD in 1981 from the University of Michigan. He then completed a residency in Anatomic Pathology at Washington University in St. Louis, and a fellowship in Hematopathology at the University of Florida in Gainesville. He joined the faculty of St. Jude Children's Research Hospital in 1984 and has risen through the ranks to his present position as Scientific Director, Deputy Director, and Executive Vice President. The work in his own laboratory is focused on the investigation of the fundamental regulatory mechanisms that control normal and leukemic hematopoiesis, and on cancer genomics and its application to the diagnosis and treatment of pediatric cancers. He is currently leading the St. Jude Pediatric Cancer Genome Project.
Duncavage MDEric J. Duncavage, MD, is an assistant professor of anatomic and molecular pathology at Washington University in St. Louis. He completed his residency training at Washington University followed by fellowship at ARUP Reference Laboratory, and is board-certificated in anatomic pathology, clinical pathology, hematopathology and molecular diagnostic pathology. His primary research interest is the application of next generation sequencing technologies to molecular oncology diagnostics. Eric has been extensively involved in the development of informatics used to detect the full spectrum of sequence variation present in cancer such as single nucleotide variants, insertions, deletions, copy number variation, and translocations, and co-directs clinical assay development at the Washington University outreach laboratory, WU-GPS (wugps.wustl.edu). Eric is a member of the Clinical Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) for sequencing-based clinical diagnostics and trains fellows and residents in molecular diagnostics.
E
 
F
Ferber PhDMatthew J. Ferber, PhD, received his undergraduate degree in biology at the University of Wisconsin, Eau Claire in 1995 and went on to obtain his PhD in Molecular Biology and Biochemistry at the Mayo College of Medicine Graduate Program in 2003. Dr. Ferber was then accepted as a Post Doctoral Fellow in the Molecular Genetics Laboratory within the Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology at the Mayo Clinic where he later became a Co-Director of the laboratory in 2005. Dr. Ferber has research interests in hereditary cancer syndromes, Wilson disease, and Next Generation Sequencing methodologies. He has quickly become an expert and leader in the world of Next Generation Sequencing technology as he has given numerous invited presentations both nationally and internationally on the application of these methods to identify, classify, and treat human disease. He was recently appointed the Director of the newly formed Next Generation Sequencing Laboratory at the Mayo Clinic which will serve as a core facility for all clinical Next Generation testing at the clinic. He is also the Co-Director of the Clinomics Program within the Mayo Clinic's Center for Individualized Medicine whose primary aim is to implement Next Generation technologies in the pursuit of more personalized patient care.
Karen Frank, MD, PhD, completed her MD and PhD in Biochemistry at the University of Pennsylvania. She completed a Clinical Pathology Residency at the Brigham & Women's Hospital. During her postdoctoral research fellowship in Immunology, she focused on V(D)J recombination in developing lymphocytes in the laboratory of Dr. Fred Alt at the Boston Children's Hospital. Dr. Frank is a board-certified Clinical Pathologist, with twelve years experience as a clinical microbiologist and five years of experience as Director of Clinical Microbiology & Immunology Laboratories. She served as Director of the Lab Service Center and Phlebotomy, and as an Associate Director of a Pathology Residency Program. Dr. Frank serves on the Resident In-Service Exam Committee of the American Society of Clinical Pathology, has served on the executive council of the Academy of Clinical Laboratory Physicians and Scientists, and has been the Director of an ACGME-accredited Clinical Microbiology Fellowship. She has served as a consultant for medical student education and clinical algorithms for bacterial antibiotic resistance testing in the laboratories of two hospitals in China as part of the Wuhan Medical Education Reform Project. She is involved in both translational and basic science projects. Translational projects include an evaluation of MALDI-TOF identification of microorganisms and molecular methods for viral detection in transplant patients. The basic science project involves the investigation of the mechanism of lung injury due to Staphylococcus aureus alpha-hemolysin using a murine model of pneumonia. She joined the Department of Laboratory Medicine in the Clinical Center at NIH in 2012.
Michael Friez, PhD, is board certified by the American Board of Medical Genetics in Clinical Molecular Genetics. Following his graduate training at the University of North Dakota, he pursued fellowship training in the field of Medical Genetics at the Greenwood Genetic Center (GGC). After completing his fellowship training and gaining valuable experience in the field, Dr. Friez assumed the position as Director of the GGC Molecular Diagnostic Laboratory in 2001. In 2008, Dr. Friez was named Director of the Diagnostic Laboratories at GGC where his primary duties involve supervising the diverse genetic testing activities the laboratory has developed since its inception. Dr. Friez also has significant interest in the ongoing research endeavours in the field of intellectual disabilities which is the primary area of interest in Greenwood. Most recently, Dr. Friez and his team have begun focusing their efforts in the area of Next Generation Sequencing to improve the diagnostic yield for many of the inherited conditions present in patients referred to GGC for clinical services. The goal of the cohesive clinical and laboratory-based team in Greenwood is to improve the diagnosis of individuals affected by genetic disorders and to move towards more treatment-related activities that offset the limitations imposed by many of these disorders.
G
Green MD MPHRobert Green, MD, MPH, is a medical geneticist and a leading researcher in translational genomics and health outcomes. For 12 years, Dr. Green has directed the NIH-funded REVEAL Study, in which a multi-disciplinary team has conducted 4 separate multi-center randomized clinical trials collectively enrolling 1100 individuals to explore emerging themes in translational genomics. Dr. Green also co-directs the NIH-funded PGen Study, the first prospective research on the medical impact of direct-to-consumer genetic testing services. Most recently, he is leading a Brigham-Harvard Medical School team of 40 scientists in the NIH-funded MedSeq Project, the first outcomes study to explore the impact of whole genome sequencing in clinical medicine.Dr. Green is currently Associate Director for Research of the Partners Center for Personalized Genetic Medicine and an Associate Professor of Medicine in the Division of Genetics at Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School.
Groenen PhDPatricia JTA Groenen, PhD, is a clinical molecular biologist in pathology and investigator at the department of Pathology of the Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre (RUNMC), Nijmegen, the Netherlands. Since 2000, Dr. Groenen is responsible for the molecular testings in the molecular laboratory within the department of Pathology RUNMC. The molecular pathology laboratory is also part of the Laboratory of Tumor Genetics, RUNMC since 2009. Dr. Groenen is specialized in molecular clonality assessment for lymphoma diagnostics and was involved in developing the BIOMED-2/Euroclonality Ig/TCR gene rearrangement assays and introducing these assays in the pathology laboratory. She is the initiator and organizer of the international Euroclonality/BIOMED-2 workshop: “Clonality assessment in pathology”, given annually in Nijmegen for pathologists and molecular biologists. In addition to clonality assessment, her diagnostic activities cover molecular tests CLL / lymphoma as well as solid tumors, together with the tests for prediction of therapy response. Her academic interests include the molecular basis and characterization of tumors and the implications of relevant findings for early diagnosis, prognosis and prediction of treatment. These research activities are integrated within the Radboud Institute for Oncology. The focus of her translational research is on lymphoma and melanoma.
Toumy Guettouche, PhD, is an Assistant Professor at the Department of Human Genetics, University of Miami, School of Medicine. He is the Director of Research and Development for the CLIA lab of the Division of Clinical and Translational Genetics. He is also the Director of the Oncogenomics Core Facility (OCF) at the Sylvester Cancer Center and the Director for New Technology Assessment and Implementation, Hussman Institute for Human Genomics (HIHG)-Center for Genome Technology. He worked at Bayer Diagnostics and Digene developing tests and tools including HCV and HPV genotyping assays. One of his primary objectives is to evaluate and acquire next-gen technology in the field of genomics and molecular diagnostics and implement it for both research and clinical utilization.
GulleyMargaret L. Gulley, MD, is professor and Director of Molecular Pathology in the Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine at University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Dr. Gulley's research focuses on viral oncogenesis and associated laboratory tests for diagnosis and management of affected patients. Dr. Gulley works with multiple professional groups to promote high quality molecular services in clinical laboratories worldwide.
H
Hailing MD PhDKevin C. Halling, MD, PhD, is an Associate Professor in the Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology at the Mayo Clinic. He co-directs the Clinical Molecular Genetics and Molecular Anatomic Pathology Laboratories. He is the past chair of the CAP Molecular Oncology Committee. Dr. Halling's primary clinical and research interests are in the development and clinical implementation of assays for detecting tumor, determining prognosis, and guiding therapy of patients with cancer. Dr. Halling has published over 90 peer-reviewed scientific articles that primarily deal with cancer genetics and the molecular diagnosis of cancer.
Hayden MDRandall T. Hayden, MD, is Director of Clinical and Molecular Microbiology and Member in the Department of Pathology at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, in Memphis, Tennessee. He joined the faculty there in 2000, following post-doctoral training in microbiology and molecular microbiology at the Mayo Clinic and in surgical pathology at the MD Anderson Cancer Center. He is board certified in Anatomic and Clinical Pathology with sub-specialty certification in Medical Microbiology. His research interests focus on the application of molecular methods to diagnostic challenges in clinical microbiology, with particular emphasis on the diagnosis of infections in the immunocompromised host. Work in his laboratory has included development of several assays for the quantitative detection of systemic viral disease in hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients. He has also worked on several new methods for enhancing detection of fungal infections, including the use of both antigen detection and molecular amplification assays for this purpose. He is editor-in-chief of “Diagnostic Microbiology of the Immunocompromised Host” and co-editor of the second edition of the widely read “Molecular Microbiology, Diagnostic Principles and Practice”, both from ASM Press. He serves on several editorial boards, including roles as editor of “Clinical Microbiology Reviews” and associate editor for the “Journal of Clinical Virology. ”
Charles E. Hill, MD, PhD is Director of the Molecular Diagnostics Laboratory at Emory University Hospital. After receiving his PhD in molecular and cellular biology and MD at the Medical University of South Carolina, Dr. Hill was a resident and chief resident in Anatomic and Clinical Pathology at Emory University. He remained as fellow in Molecular Genetic Pathology at Emory and joined the Emory faulty in 2004. His research has focused on new clinical test development, pharmacogenetic testing, and tumor diagnostics. Dr. Hill has served as the Hematopathology Representative to the Training and Education Committee, Hematopathology subdivision chair, Molecular Curriculum Task Force Chair, and member of the JAK2 working group for the Association for Molecular Pathology. He is on the editorial board for the Journal of Molecular Diagnostics. Dr. Hill is currently Associate Professor of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Pathology Residency Director, and co-director of the Molecular Genetic Pathology Fellowship for Emory University School of Medicine.
Steven Hodak, MD
HoyerJames D. Hoyer, MD, received both his B.S. in Microbiology, (1981) and his M.D. (1985) from The Ohio State University. He completed residencies in both family practice and anatomic/clinical pathology at the University of Wisconsin. In 1992, he completed a fellowship in Hematopathology at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota. He has been a staff hematopathologist at Mayo Clinic for almost 20 years. He is Professor of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology, Mayo Medical School, and is the director of the Metabolic Hematology Laboratory. His interests are in thalassemias, hemoglobinopathies, hemolytic anemias, and in bone marrow pathology. He is on the Board of Directors of the International Society for Laboratory Hematology (ISLH) and serves as an advisor to both the International Skating Union (ISU) and the Federation Internationale de Natation (FINA).
I
 
J
Lawrence Jennings, MD, PhD, D(ABHI), FCAP is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine Northwestern University's Feinberg School of Medicine. He is board-certificated in anatomic and clinical pathology, molecular genetic pathology, histocompatibility and immunogenetics. He is director of HLA and molecular diagnostic laboratories at Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago. Dr. Jennings chairs the Molecular Oncology Resource Committee for the College of American Pathologists and also serves as CAP out-bound liaison to ACMG and the Genetic Testing Reference Material Coordination Program (GeT-RM) at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).
Elaine Jeter, MD is currently the Palmetto GBA J1 MolDx Medical Director. She is a graduate of the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) and is board certified in Clinical and Anatomic Pathology, and Blood Banking/Transfusion Medicine. She received her undergraduate degree from the State University of New York and her master's from the University of South Carolina. Elaine was an academic physician at MUSC for 10 years, and in the private practice of pathology in Columbia, SC for a number of years. She has been with Palmetto GBA for 7 years.
K
KalmanLisa Kalman, PhD, directs the Genetic Testing Reference Material Coordination Program (GeT-RM) at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in Atlanta GA, USA. Dr. Kalman earned her BS degree in Biology and her PhD in Microbiology and Molecular Genetics from the University of California, Los Angeles. She also completed a postdoctoral fellowship at Stanford University in Developmental Biology and Biochemistry. She partners with members of the genetic testing community to coordinate a voluntary, sustainable process to improve the quality of clinical genetic testing. Dr. Kalman previously worked with the CDC Newborn Screening Quality Assurance Program studying issues related to the laboratory quality of state newborn screening programs. In addition to the development of reference materials, Dr. Kalman's primary research focus is development of best practices guidelines and laboratory standards in genetics and molecular pathology. Lisa is active with the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI). She is a member of the Consensus Committee on Molecular Methods, Chair of the Document Development Committee on Proficiency Testing for Molecular Methods, and a member of several other Document Development Committees. She has also authored several other guidance documents related to molecular genetic testing.
Barry N. Kreiswirth, PhD received his BA from Hamilton College and his PhD from New York University. He is the founding director of the Public Health Research Institute (PHRI) TB Center, a Professor of Medicine at UMDNJ and Visiting Scientist at the Museum of Natural History. Dr Kreiswirth joined PHRI as a graduate student in 1978 in Dr. Richard Novick's laboratory where he studied the molecular biology of Staphylococcus aureus and ultimately cloned and characterized the genetic determinant responsible for toxic shock syndrome. In 1992, in response to the New York City tuberculosis outbreaks, the PHRI TB Center was established as a genotyping laboratory to study the molecular epidemiology of tuberculosis. The Center characterized the highly multidrug resistant strain W and beginning in 1992 it has genetically characterized over 30,000 M. tuberculosis isolates from global sources. The Center has also focused on the molecular epidemiology of multidrug resistant pathogens including methicillin resistant S. aureus and carbapenem resistant Enterobacteriaceae and developed spa typing and other molecular assays to track these resistant organisms.
Shashikant Kulkarni, M.S. , Ph.D. , FACMG is the Medical Director of Genomics and Pathology Services and Medical Director of Cytogenomics and Molecular Pathology at Washington University School of Medicine at St Louis. He is an Associate Professor in the departments of Pathology & Immunology, Pediatrics and Genetics. He has been trained at Harvard Medical School, Washington University and Hammersmith Hospital at Imperial College, London. As the Medical Director of Cytogenomics and Molecular Pathology, Dr. Kulkarni oversees one of the most modern CLIA certified and CAP accredited state-of-art full-service academic cytogenomics and molecular pathology laboratories in the country. The lab utilizes Cytogenetics, FISH, Chromosomal Microarray, Sanger sequencing and Next-Generation Sequencing methodology for clinical diagnostic testing. This laboratory has been at the forefront in implementing molecular genomic methods in clinical diagnostic testing for Clinical Genomics testing performed on all tissue types for diagnosis of congenital anomalies and mental retardation; leukemias, lymphomas and other hematological disorders; and solid neoplasms. These tests include prenatal diagnostics, perinatal and childhood studies in the evaluation of congenital and developmental disorders, infertility and pregnancy loss studies, and cancer.
L
Laposata MD PhDMichael Laposata, MD, PhD, is the Edward and Nancy Fody Professor of Pathology and Medicine at Vanderbilt University School of Medicine. He is the Pathologist-in-Chief at Vanderbilt University Hospital and Director of Clinical Laboratories. He received his M.D. and Ph.D. from Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and completed a postdoctoral research fellowship and residency in Laboratory Medicine (Clinical Pathology) at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. He took his first faculty position at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine in Philadelphia in 1985, where he was an Assistant Professor and Director of the hospital's coagulation laboratory. In 1989, he became Director of Clinical Laboratories at the Massachusetts General Hospital and was appointed to faculty in pathology at Harvard Medical School, where he became a tenured full Professor of Pathology. Dr. Laposata is the recipient of 14 major teaching prizes at Harvard, the Massachusetts General Hospital, and the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine.
Laser MDJordan Laser, MD, is currently the Assistant Medical Director of the Core Laboratory and the Senior Director of Cytogenetics and Molecular Pathology at North Shore-LIJ Health System in New York. He received his medical degree at the Sackler School of Medicine at Tel Aviv University in Israel, followed by an AP/CP residency at NYU-Langone Medical Center in New York. Jordan completed his training in Molecular Genetic Pathology at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York.
LiMarilyn Li, MD, is a professor of Molecular and Human genetics, the Director of the Cancer Genetics Laboratory at Baylor College of Medicine. Dr. Li received her M.D. degree at Tongji Medical College of Huazhong University of Science and Technology and had her fellowship training in Clinical Cytogenetics and Clinical Molecular Genetics at University of Pennsylvania/Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. She holds American Board of Medical Genetics certification in Clinical Cytogenetics and Clinical Molecular Genetics. Prior to her appointment at Baylor College of Medicine, she served as the Director of the Tulane Clinical Cytogenetics Laboratory, Clinical Molecular Genetics Laboratory, Tulane Matrix DNA Diagnostic Laboratory, and the director of the Genomics Core Laboratory of Louisiana Cancer Research Consortium. She is a fellow of the American College of Medical Genetics, the American Society of Human Genetics, the Southwest Oncology Group and the Children's Oncology Group, the Association of Molecular Pathology, the American Society of Hematology, American Society of Clinical Oncology. Dr. Li's primary research interest is clinical application of microarray and next generation sequencing technologies in cancer research and diagnosis. Her group has studied over 500 cancer genomes using custom-designed cancer-specific arrays and has demonstrated that microarray-based testing not only confirm and define cytogenetic- and FISH-detectable genomic aberrations but also reveal many previously unrecognized copy number alterations that can be used for risk stratification for appropriate therapeutic interventions and for disease follow-up. Some of these genomic aberrations can also be therapeutic targets. Her labrecently started utilizing next generation sequencing technology to sequence tumor samples for hundreds of cancer-associated mutations including clinically actionable mutations. She initiated, organized and is the president of the Cancer Cytogenomics Microarray Consortium, an international consortium whose mission is to facilitate the development and utilization of microarray-based technology and NGS technology for high quality, reliable cancer genetic testing in diagnostic laboratories. She is the recipient of the 2010-2011 Luminex/ACMGF Award for the promotion of safe and effective genetic testing and services. Other research projects in her lab include studies of common leukemia- and lymphoma-associated genetic aberrations in healthy individuals and chromosome microdeletion syndromes. She is an active member of the medical school and is involved in teaching medical students and Ph.D. students, and training residents and fellows.
Janina Longtine, MD, is the Vice-Chair of Molecular Pathology and Genetics in the Department of Pathology at The Mt. Sinai Medical Center, NY, NY.Shereceived her B.A. from Wellesley College and earned her M.D. at the University of Massachusetts Medical School. She completed a residency in Anatomic Pathology with subspecialty training in Hematopathology at Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston and a post-doctoral research fellowship in molecular biology at Children's Hospital Boston. She is board-certified in Anatomic Pathology and Molecular Genetic Pathology. Her area of academic interest is developing and applying diagnostic, prognostic or predictive molecular assays to patient care.
LyonElaine Lyon, PhD, is an Associate Professor in the Department of Pathology, University of Utah School of Medicine. In addition to her academic duties, Dr. Lyon is the Medical Director of Molecular Genetics and Genomics and Co-medical director of Pharmacogenetics at ARUP Laboratories, where she has overseen the growth of these laboratories for over 15 years. As a Medical Director, Dr. Lyon develops and validates new tests, reviews clinical molecular test results and provides sequence variant interpretation. Dr. Lyon is a past chair of AMP's Clinical Practice Committee and Professional Relations Committee, and is stepping into the role of President-elect. She is currently a member of CAP/ACMG's Molecular Resource Committee and the AMA's Molecular Pathology Coding Workgroup.
M
MakrigiorgosG. Michael Makrigiorgos, PhD, DABMP, is Professor and Division Director of the combined Radiation Oncology Department at Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Brigham and Women's and Children's Hospitals, at Harvard Medical School. He also directs the DNA technology laboratory and the radiation pre-clinical facility. His research interests include the development of novel DNA technologies for molecular diagnostics with application in Oncology. He is the inventor of several novel PCR-based techniques for molecular diagnostics, including Balanced-PCR, Anti-primer-quenching-real-time PCR, Hairpin-PCR and COLD-PCR. He is a Member of the Editorial Board of Clinical Chemistry and has published over 100 articles, reviews and book chapters.
Aneesh K. Mehta, MD is an Assistant Professor of Medicine at Emory University, where he also serves as the Assistant Director of Transplant Infectious Diseases at the Emory Transplant Center and the Consultation for Occupational Exposures at the Yerkes National Primate Center. Dr. Mehta's research area is broadly within clinical and translational viral immunology, with a primary research aim to develop predictive immunologic and virologic signatures of risk for viral diseases in patients receiving immunosuppressive agents. He primarily employs polychromatic flow cytometry to phenotypically and functionally describe subsets of the protective immune system, and correlate these data with molecular markers of viral infections. He is the PI of the Emory Viral Monitoring Core of the NIH Sponsored Clinical Trials in Organ Transplantation (CTOT) projects. He also serves as a co-investigator and primary clinical investigator for Emory University Influenza Pathogenesis & Immunology Research Center (IPIRC), is one of five national Influenza Centers of Excellence funded by NIH/NIAID. He also supervises the Herpes B surveillance program at the Yerkes Primate Center.
N
Lee N. Newcomer, MD, MHA, is the Senior Vice President, UnitedHealthcare with strategic responsibility for Oncology, Genetics and Women's Health. Prior to rejoining United Health Group (UHG), Dr. Newcomer was a founding executive of Vivius, a consumer directed venture that allowed consumers to create their own personalized health plans. From 1991 to 2000, Dr. Newcomer held a number of positions at UHG, including Chief Medical Officer. His work there emphasized the development of performance measures and incentives to improve clinical care. Prior to joining UHG, he was Medical Director for CIGNA Health Care of Kansas City. Dr. Newcomer is a board certified medical oncologist; he practiced medical oncology for nine years in Tulsa, Oklahoma and Minneapolis (Park Nicollet Clinic). He is the former Chairman of Park Nicollet Health Services, an integrated system of over 700 physicians and a 400 bed hospital. The group is nationally recognized for its leadership in quality, safety and lean processes. Dr. Newcomer earned a Bachelor of Arts degree in biology from Nebraska Wesleyan University, an MD degree from the University of Nebraska, College of Medicine, and an MS degree in health administration from the University of Wisconsin at Madison. He completed his internship and residency in internal medicine from the University of Nebraska Hospital, and fellowships in medical oncology and administrative medicine from the Yale University School of Medicine and the University of Wisconsin at Madison, respectively.
Yuri Nikiforov, MD, PhD is Professor of Pathology at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center where he serves as Director of the Division of Molecular Anatomic Pathology. His clinical and research interest is in thyroid cancer, with particular focus on identifying novel genetic alterations in thyroid cancer and use of mutational markers for preoperative diagnosis of thyroid nodules and tumor prognostication. He has published more than 100 peer-reviewed articles in journals such as Science, Journal of Clinical Inverstigation, and Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences USA as well as more than 15 book chapters, and is senior editor of the book Diagnostic Pathology and Molecular Genetics of the Thyroid published by Wolters Kluwer Health. His recent article reporting the impact of mutational testing on the diagnosis and management of patients with thyroid nodules received the Endocrine Society's International Award for Publishing Excellence in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism in 2011. He is an elected member of the American Society for Clinical Investigation and recipient of the Van Meter Award from the American Thyroid Association.
O
Jennifer L. Oliveira, MD, is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology at the Mayo Clinic. She joined the division of hematopathology in 2007 after completing a hematopathology fellowship at the University of Texas Health Sciences Center in San Antonio and a surgical pathology fellowship at Mayo Clinic. She is a co-director of the Metabolic Hematology Laboratory with James D. Hoyer with laboratory emphasis in thalassemias, hemoglobinopathies, red blood cell enzyme and membrane disorders and hereditary erythrocytosis. Additional interests include bone marrow and lymph node pathology.
P
ParkSandra Park is a Staff Attorney in the ACLU Women's Rights Project. At WRP, Sandra engages in litigation, policy advocacy, and public education at the national, state, and local levels to advance the rights and civil liberties of women and girls. Sandra has advocated for the rights of survivors of gender-based violence throughout her legal career, and her current work includes challenging discrimination against victims in housing, employment, education, and government services. She is also counsel on the first lawsuit brought in the U.S. challenging the patenting of human genes. Sandra chairs the Committee on Domestic Violence at the New York City Bar Association. Before joining the ACLU, she worked as a Skadden Fellow at the Legal Aid Society of New York and clerked for U.S. District Judge Alvin Hellerstein of the Southern District of New York. She is a magna cum laude graduate of Harvard College and NYU School of Law.
Parsons MD PhDWill Parsons, MD, PhD, is a board-certified pediatric oncologist at Texas Children's Cancer Center (Baylor College of Medicine, BCM). He is the Director of the Center for Personal Cancer Genomics and Therapeutics at Texas Children's Cancer Center and has an active research program in clinical cancer genomics. His research focuses on the use of high-throughput sequencing technologies to investigate the biology of pediatric cancers and the clinical application of those methods. He is the PI (with Sharon Plon, MD PhD) of the ongoing NHGRI-funded BASIC3 project (Baylor Advancing Sequencing in Childhood Cancer Care), which is studying the clinical application of CLIA-certified tumor and germline exome sequencing for children newly-diagnosed with CNS and non-CNS solid tumors.
Q
 
R
RobicsekAri A. Robicsek, MD, trained in Medicine at the University of Toronto and in Infectious Diseases at Harvard Medical School. He serves as Vice President for Clinical and Quality Informatics at NorthShore University HealthSystem, and is a Clinical Associate Professor of Medicine at the University of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine. He oversees the Clinical Analytics Department, developing informatics tools that improve the quality and efficiency of care. Projects include risk-based testing for MRSA using predictive modeling technology, and Electronic Medical Record-based syndromic surveillance.
S
SchoenbrunnerRalf Schoenbrunner, PhD, is a founding member of the International Consortium for Harmonization of Clinical Laboratory Results, which was initiated by the AACC. It is the groups Mission to provide a centralized process to organize global efforts to achieve harmonization of clinical laboratory test results. Ralf is also the Vice President of Research and Development in the Medical Sciences Division at Life Technologies. He's heading the AcroMetrix Research and Development team, where his team develops calibrators and controls for a wide range of molecular assays. Ralf graduated with a Ph.D. in Physical Biochemistry from the University of Bayreuth, Germany.
Shiffman MDMitchell L Shiffman, MD, is the Director of the Liver Institute Virginia at the Bon Secours Virginia Health System with offices in Richmond and Newport News, Virginia. He is also a Professor Medicine at the Eastern Virginia Medical School, Norfolk, Virginia. Between 1990-2009, Dr Shiffman was the Chief of the Hepatology Section and Medical Director of the Liver Transplant Program at the Virginia Commonwealth University Medical Center in Richmond, Virginia. Dr. Shiffman received his MD degree from the State University of New York Upstate Medical Center in Syracuse, completed an internship and residency in Internal Medicine and a fellowship in Gastroenterology and Hepatology at the VCU-Medical College of Virginia. Dr Shiffman has edited 3 books on liver disease and has published over 250 peer reviewed articles nearly all of which deal with various aspects of liver disease. His writing and clinical research has focused primarily on viral hepatitis C and B where he is considered an international key opinion leader.
SnyderMichael Snyder, PhD, is Professor and Chair of Genetics and Director of Center for Genomics and Personalized Medicine. He has run an independent lab for twenty-five years and trained approximately 89 postdoctoral fellows and 52 graduate students. Nearly all (>95%) these individuals have gone onto successful research careers in academia or industry. The remainder has used their experience successfully in related fields (law, medicine or pharmaceutical industry). He currently sits on the Advisory Committees including the Northeast Structural Genomics Consortium Scientific Advisory Committee and the P.I. Yale Center of Excellence in Genome Sciences. He is the Member and Chair of the NIH MABS study section and is also on the EMBL, Scientific Advisory Committee.
Spitzer PhDSilvia G. Spitzer, PhD, obtained her PhD in Biochemistry at the School of Exact and Natural Sciences in Buenos Aires. She did her postdoctoral training at Johns Hopkins University and St. Louis University. She then took a faculty position in the Department of Pathology at Stony Brook University where she initially did basic research and also started the Molecular Diagnostics laboratory. She has been a member of AMP since it was first founded in 1995. At present she is an Associate Professor of Pathology and the director of the molecular diagnostics lab at Stony Brook medical center and at North Shore LIJ system.
Christian Steidl, MD is appointed at the rank of Assistant Professor in the Department of Pathology at the University of British Columbia and Scientist in the Department of Experimental Therapeutics at the British Columbia Cancer Agency (BCCA) leading a translational lymphoma research laboratory in the Centre for Lymphoid Cancer. He is a physician scientist, having obtained his M.D. and Ph.D. -equivalent degree from the Universities of Muenster and Witten-Herdecke in Germany. Dr Steidl is most known for the discovery of novel gene fusions in Hodgkin lymphoma and primary mediastinal B cell lymphoma using whole transcriptome sequencing, and his work on the microenvironment in Hodgkin lymphoma.
T
TsongalisGregory J. Tsongalis, PhD, is currently the Director of Molecular Pathology, co-director of the Pathology Translational Research program and co-director of the Pharmacogenomics program at the Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center in Lebanon, NH. He received his Ph.D. in Pathology from the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey and completed his postdoctoral training in Pathology and Laboratory Medicine at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. His area of expertise is in clinical molecular diagnostic applications for genetic, hematologic, infectious, and neoplastic diseases. His research interests are in the pathogenesis of solid tumors, disease association of SNP genotyping and personalized medicine. He has authored/edited eight textbooks in the field of molecular pathology, published more than 130 peer reviewed manuscripts, and has been an invited speaker at both national and international meetings. Dr. Tsongalis has been the recipient of numerous investigator/scientist awards. He has served on numerous committees of the AACC, ASIP, and AMP where he is a past President. He is on the editorial board of J Molec Diagn, Archiv Pathol Lab Med, J Clin Virol, Exper Molec Pathol, Am J Transl Res, and the Intl J Clin Exp Pathol. He also serves on numerous corporate scientific advisory boards.
U
 
V
Alexandra Valsamakis, MD, PhD
Versalovic MD PhDJames Versalovic, MD, PhD, currently serves as a NIH-funded Principal Investigator of a research team and laboratory exploring the molecular mechanisms of probiosis or the ways in which beneficial gut microbes regulate the physiology and immunity of the gastrointestinal tract. His main focus has been the investigation of probiotics-mediated immunoregulation of the gut mucosa and innate immunity, although he is also delving into the gastrointestinal microbiome and amino acid metabolism in the intestine. James serves as Prinipal Investigator of a NIDDK-funded clinical demonstration project, part of the Human Microbiome Project (HMP), and collaborative studies focused on the composition and function of the gut microbiome in children with chronic gatronistestinal conditions. He serves on the local community of TMC DDC investigators in pursuit of gene expression, genomics, protein profiling and metogenomics/microbiome studies. Lastly, he serves as Co-Director of the NIH-funded Medical Scientist training program and as a mentor in the NIDDK-funded T32 program training young PhD and MD investigators in pedatric gastroenterology.
David S. Viswanatha, MD
W
 
X
 
Y
 
Z